Sapsaree Introduction

Sapsaree Introduction

Sapsarees are native Korean dogs that have inhabited widely in Korean peninsula. Their name means to "drive away evil spirits and bring blessings." Sapsarees, which frequently appear in Korean historical records, were loved and reared by the royal families and aristocrats since the Silla Dynasty around 400 A.D. Sapsarees worked as military dogs and accompanied leading Generals in the war. As the Silla Unification period ended, Sapsarees began to be reared by the common people. In Koryo and Chosun Dynasty Era, Sapsarees shared the joys and sorrows with our Korean ancestors. Under the Japanese occupation of Korea, 100,000-500,000 Sapsarees were yearly slaughtered for Japanese soldiers fur coats. During the Korean War in 1950s, the number of Sapsarees substantially decreased and Sapsarees were suddenly in danger of extinction. In 1969, search for Sapsarees were carried out by the professors of Kyungpook National University and thirty Sapsarees were found in the backwoods of Kyungpook province. This marked the beginning of Sapsarees revival. In 1985, the preservation of Sapsarees resumed with the effort by Professor Ji-Hong Ha of Kyungpook National University, and systematic research for breeding began. In 2007, the number of Sapsarees being reared proliferated to approximately 3,000. Of those, 2,500 are being raised by the members of Korean Sapsaree Foundation and the other 500 are being collectively reared by the Foundation.

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